UNESCO

The UNESCO convention shall harmonize the global fight against doping in sport.

The International Convention against Doping in Sport was adopted unanimously by the 33rd UNESCO General Conference on October 19, 2005, and went into force on February 1, 2007, following the 30th ratification. UNESCO Member States are now ratifying it individually according to their respective constitutional jurisdictions.

The UNESCO convention shall harmonize the global fight against doping in sport. The international anti-doping Code and WADA’s role in the anti-doping activities are consolidated through the convention.

The convention is the first global instrument specifically aimed at doping in sport, and is a follow-up of the Copenhagen Declaration that was signed by, amongst others, Norway during the World Conference against doping in 2003. Countries that have signed the UNESCO convention have a formal responsibility to follow-up the convention and the international rules published through the World Anti-Doping Code.

Norway was among the first countries to ratify the UNESCO anti-doping convention. Norway also participated actively in the development of the Convention. The Ministry was represented at the Intergovernmental Meetings of Experts (Category II Meetings). Norway also provided a financial contribution to UNESCO, in order to ensure the drafting process of the Anti-Doping Convention.

Some of the central elements in the convention are as follows:

  • to promote the prevention of and the fight against doping in sport
  • to promote and encourage international collaboration in the fight against doping in sport
  • to promote and encourage research in the field of anti-doping

More information to be found on UNESCO’s webpage.